11Nov
New Survey from Vacancy Filler Finds Job Market Increasingly Candidate-Driven
Business

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A new survey from Vacancy Filler,  leading supplier of cloud-based, online recruitment systems, who are exhibiting at the CIPD show (stand D32),  revealed that almost half of  job applicants interviewed for the survey said that if a careers page and website were difficult to navigate or looked outdated, they would look elsewhere for a job.

The survey, which covered a wide range of sectors, examined how candidates search for and apply for roles, the negative effects of poor communication and the impact of a poor careers page and concluded that businesses need to treat candidates in the same way in which they interact with their customers.

The survey found that out of the candidates asked, 66% stated that a difficult to navigate careers page would negatively impact their impression of a company. And 64% of candidates asked expected to be able to apply for roles online. Other findings include:-

  • 49% of candidates stated they would boycott a company if they had a bad experience in applying for a job with them.
  • 86% of candidates said it was important to them to receive confirmation that their applications had been received.
  • 76% of candidates consulted job boards in order to find a new position.
  • 84% were more likely to apply for a post where job duties were clearly defined.
  • 67% would tell others of a bad recruitment experience.

Tony Brookes, Sales Director, Vacancy Filler, said,

” The job market, despite some post-referendum economic uncertainty, is now candidate-driven.   The expectations and demands of candidates have grown, and the most successful businesses are starting to respond by prioritising the creation of a competitive online presence and an effective online recruiter brand; at the forefront of this is the company website and careers page.  As most candidates turn to the internet first as a means of job hunting, it is important to make the best first impression as it could be the only opportunity to win individuals over.”

The company found that while careers pages should show current vacancies, it is almost more important to show the benefits of working for the company, the culture and the values.

Tony continued,

“Much like online shopping allows customers to purchase items at their convenience, even on their mobile phones, job applications should always be available to candidates.   A fully optimised careers site is essential, especially in capturing passive candidates. Candidates are often also customers; it is common for this to be the reason that has brought them to apply in the first place, which makes it essential not to alienate them by creating a poor candidate experience.”

The survey found that those candidates that feel offended by any part of the recruitment process will boycott companies as a means of retaliation and will lose any loyalty that they previously had.  In addition, notification that job applications have been received is now a given, while a personalised rejection to a job application can even instil loyalty in a candidate.

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19Oct
Brexit Blow to Employee Confidence, as UK Workers Feel Less Confident about Careers
Business

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New research has revealed the severe impact of the Brexit vote on employee confidence across the UK workforce.

The study, which saw 2,000 members of the UK workforce surveyed, was commissioned by leading recruiter Badenoch & Clark and carried out by Opinion Matters. It found that a third (34%) of the total UK workforce feel less secure in their current roles as a result of Britain’s decision to leave the EU. Four in ten (42%) feel less positive about their long-term career prospects and (41%) believe that their employer will be negatively affected by Brexit.

Financial services workers are particularly negative about the future of their industry and their place in it, with 44% feeling less positive about their long-term career prospects after the Brexit vote. This compares with 41% of those in professional services and 40% of public sector workers.

The Brexit vote also seems to have led to an increase in Britons’ willingness to move abroad for a job. One in five (20%) said they were now more likely to look for a new role outside of the UK.

The figures are even more striking amongst the surveyed EU/EEA employees, with 75% of EU/EEA workers saying they were feeling less positive about their long-term career prospects. 54% said they were more likely to look for a new role outside the UK after the Brexit vote, and 67% of EU/EEA workers said they felt less secure in their current roles after the vote.

The findings suggest that employers across the UK must work harder to retain their staff leading up to and after Britain’s eventual split from the European Union. To help employers do this, Badenoch & Clark will publish a series of recommendations for UK-based businesses, advising them on how they can manage talent mobility.

The recommendations will urge UK employers to stay mindful of what motivates their staff to stay in their current role. 56% of the total UK workforce said pay increases were the biggest driver in encouraging them to stay with their employer, whilst 13% said they were driven by flexible working, 13% by promotions, 9% by training and development opportunities and 5% upskilling into a new business area.

EU/EEA workers in the UK were slightly less likely to be driven by pay increases (50%). They were more likely to be attracted by training and development opportunities (15%) and the chance to be upskilled into a new business area (10%).

Katy Crothall, Operations Director at Badenoch & Clark, said:

“We have always known that the UK boasts a highly mobile workforce, and Britain’s departure from the European Union looks like it’s going to exacerbate this trend further.

“Although the impact of Brexit isn’t yet known, this research shows that a significant section of the UK workforce feel less confident about their career and are considering moving away from the UK, a trend that is particularly strong amongst EU and EEA citizens currently working in the UK.

“Businesses must therefore be mindful of what drives their employee’s loyalty, and Badenoch & Clark are shortly publishing key steps to managing mobility to help UK businesses do just that.”

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03Sep
Most employees not satisfied with benefits schemes
Business

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Workplace benefits schemes might not be providing what employees want, as many are unsatisfied with the offerings

The majority (60%) of employees are dissatisfied with their benefits schemes, according to research from Thomsons Online Benefits.

The Global Employee Benefits Watch 16/17 revealed that 70% of workers would like benefits options communicated to them around life changes, for example marriage. However, only 40% said they felt their benefits are “very relevant” to their personal situations.

Employees also took issue with how benefits were presented to them, with almost a fifth (18%) stating that they are not happy with how they have to interact with benefits. A similar number (17%) said they are unhappy with the way benefits are communicated to them.

Matthew Gregson, consulting director of Thomsons Online Benefits, said this lack of engagement is undermining benefits schemes.

“HR professionals understand the link between benefits engagement and broader workplace engagement, but they’re stumbling at the first hurdle – engaging employees in their reward schemes,” he said.

“Organisations with the highest performing benefits schemes have shown that overcoming this obstacle isn’t impossible, but depends on unlocking the power of data to take a more personal approach to benefits. Using data analytics employers can create a global benefits strategy based on quantifiable insights into how employees are interacting with their schemes and the benefits they really want.”

Separate research from Direct365 found that only 40% of 18- to 24-year-olds are hooked by job perks and incentives when they look for a new job.

The survey uncovered a large generational gap, as 70% of 35- to 44-year-olds do take them into consideration when on a job hunt.

Phil Turner, head of digital at Direct365, said that extreme incentives may work for the short term, but workers have begun to look for more useful, applicable solutions.

“The problem with a lot of job perks are that the companies offering them don’t take into consideration what the employee could really use,” he said. “Fun incentives may look great on paper, but the reality is very different and companies should be working to give staff what they genuinely want. Perks that make your working day a little easier will always be attractive – not to mention peer recognition, appraisals, and real career progression. These are priceless”.

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12Jun
80% of 18- to 24-year-olds ‘waste time at work’
Business

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Looking at mobile phones was found to be the most popular time-wasting activity among young people

Four out of five (80%) 18- to 24-year-olds waste time at work, according to a survey by Conference Genie.

When asked if they ever wasted time at work, 76% of those aged 25 to 34 said either ‘sometimes’ or ‘often’. This compares with 64% of those aged 35 to 44, 57% of respondents between 45 and 54, and only 52% of those aged over 55.

Looking at mobile phones was found to be the most popular (59%) time-wasting activity for the youngest age group, while those in the oldest group wasted time by chatting with colleagues (38%) and checking personal emails (38%).

The most popular time-wasting activity when working from home was found to be general procrastination; chosen by 46%. In the office talking to colleagues was the biggest distraction, selected by 52% of respondents.

Men felt their productivity was most negatively affected by noise, with 50% citing a loud atmosphere as detrimental. Women were more likely to blame lack of sleep (56%).

When asked how their employers help boost productivity, only 31% of respondents said their organisation offers flexitime options, and 13% provide training on time management. Nearly four in 10 (39%) arrange nothing.

Simon Prince, marketing director at Conference Genie, said: “It’s surprising to see that less than a third of employers offer flexitime and as little as 17% of staff are encouraged to take regular breaks, both of which were popular with employees in our survey for boosting individual productivity.

“Our research shows that empowering people with the opportunity to work flexibly –be it remote working or flexitime –can really boost productivity,” he added. “Conference calling, instant messaging and apps can all be used to help manage groups, ensure they are all contactable and, perhaps most crucially, feel part of a team. This is especially important during ‘down’ periods. Friday 3pm to 5pm is a prime example; our survey revealed it as being the least productive part of the working week.”

Four out of five (80%) 18- to 24-year-olds waste time at work, according to a survey by Conference Genie.

When asked if they ever wasted time at work, 76% of those aged 25 to 34 said either ‘sometimes’ or ‘often’. This compares with 64% of those aged 35 to 44, 57% of respondents between 45 and 54, and only 52% of those aged over 55.

Looking at mobile phones was found to be the most popular (59%) time-wasting activity for the youngest age group, while those in the oldest group wasted time by chatting with colleagues (38%) and checking personal emails (38%).

The most popular time-wasting activity when working from home was found to be general procrastination; chosen by 46%. In the office talking to colleagues was the biggest distraction, selected by 52% of respondents.

Men felt their productivity was most negatively affected by noise, with 50% citing a loud atmosphere as detrimental. Women were more likely to blame lack of sleep (56%).

When asked how their employers help boost productivity, only 31% of respondents said their organisation offers flexitime options, and 13% provide training on time management. Nearly four in 10 (39%) arrange nothing.

Simon Prince, marketing director at Conference Genie, said: “It’s surprising to see that less than a third of employers offer flexitime and as little as 17% of staff are encouraged to take regular breaks, both of which were popular with employees in our survey for boosting individual productivity.

“Our research shows that empowering people with the opportunity to work flexibly –be it remote working or flexitime –can really boost productivity,” he added. “Conference calling, instant messaging and apps can all be used to help manage groups, ensure they are all contactable and, perhaps most crucially, feel part of a team. This is especially important during ‘down’ periods. Friday 3pm to 5pm is a prime example; our survey revealed it as being the least productive part of the working week.”

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31May
Graduates facing lower pay and fewer positions
Business

 

 

 

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Graduate pay took a hit in April, with the average advertised entry-level salary falling to £23,309

This year’s crop of graduates are facing lower pay and fewer positions as a wider slowdown in the jobs market holds back hiring, according to research from Adzuna.co.uk.

The latest Adzuna Job Market Report found that in April 12,850 vacancies were advertised for entry-level roles, 8% lower than the 15,305 positions on offer in April 2015. Graduate pay took a hit in April, with the average advertised entry-level salary falling to £23,309, which is the lowest amount on offer since October 2013 (£22,849).

April also saw UK starting pay drop to £33,462, the lowest on offer for four months since December 2015 (£33,332). On a monthly basis, average advertised salaries fell 1% from £33,815 in March. All regions except Northern Ireland witnessed a fall in average advertised salaries. For Scotland average salaries dropped to £31,537, which is also below the English and Welsh averages.

The creative and design sector was among the fastest risers when it came to average advertised salaries, climbing to £31,524 in April (up 4.7% from £30,115 the previous year). Domestic help and cleaning jobs led the way however, with a staggering 44.7% annual increase in average advertised salaries to £26,789, up from £18,516.

Doug Monro, co-founder of Adzuna, warned that salaries are struggling to kick-start properly as we leave spring and approach summer. “There were high hopes the start of the year would see strong salary growth but so far it’s looking unlikely,” he said.

He also commented on the rise in creative and design jobs, suggesting they are growing more important. “As the business environment becomes more competitive and global, branding is becoming even more important. And employers are placing more value on strong design skills and the creative abilities of potential employees. The sector isn’t known for being the best paid, but it is picking up. Employers are prepared to put a high price on creative spark”

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10May
Job-seeking hits two-year high as employee satisfaction at work plummets
Business

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Job satisfaction in the UK has dropped to its lowest level for over two years and job-seeking intentions have risen to almost a quarter (24%) of employees – a two and a half year high. Although wider global economic uncertainty has likely shaken the labour market, the world of work is changing too, and organisations therefore need to rethink their approach to employee career management, in order to engage and retain staff.

This is according to the latest CIPD/Halogen Employee Outlook report, which surveyed over 2,000 UK employees in February and March 2016. It found that job satisfaction has fallen across all sectors (net score = +40, compared to +48 in Autumn 2015), but particularly in the private sector (+41, compared +50 in Autumn 2015). Employees in micro businesses have the highest levels of job satisfaction by size of organisation at +49, but even this figure represents a substantial reduction from Autumn 2015 where job satisfaction was almost 30 points higher at +76.

Exploring a range of employee issues that could affect job satisfaction, the CIPD/Halogen survey finds that almost a fifth (23%) of employees believe their organisation’s performance management processes are unfair (an increase from 20% in Autumn 2015). Over a quarter (27%) are dissatisfied with the opportunity to develop their skills in their job and this is reflected in the number of employees who say they are unlikely to fulfil their career aspirations in their current organisation, which has also increased to 36% (32% in Autumn 2015).

Claire McCartney, research adviser for resourcing and talent planning at the CIPD, the professional body for HR and people development, comments: “Today’s research shows that our approaches to job design and career management have not kept pace with the rapidly changing world of work or with employee expectations. Although many organisations are flatter in structure and have adopted matrix ways of working, this can mean routes for career progression are not as clear. Despite wider global economic uncertainty, employers need to think of new ways to keep their employees engaged and committed.

“Organisations therefore need to redefine their approach to careers in the light of this new context in order to future-proof their workforce. They need to think about career growth in a more holistic way, rather than traditional, hierarchical progression, and instead give employees opportunities for a breadth of diverse experiences and opportunities that maximise their skills and their employability going forward.”

The survey also reveals that net satisfaction with line managers has risen to +47 (+44 in Autumn 2015). Employees in the voluntary sector (+53) are most satisfied with their managers, followed by those in the public (+48) and then the private sector (+46). Employees say that their line managers are most likely to be committed to their organisation (69%), treat employees fairly (67%), make clear what is expected of them (59%), are supportive if they have a problem (57%) and listen to their suggestions (55%). However, line managers were reported as less likely to coach employees on the job (24%), act as a role model (34%), discuss training and development needs (38%), provide feedback on performance (42%) and keep them in touch with what is going on (46%).

McCartney continues: “It’s really positive to see overall satisfaction with line managers increasing in this survey, and the findings point to the importance of quality communication and consultation between employees and line managers. However, although line managers are committing themselves to their duty of care and employee welfare, it seems they aren’t hitting the mark in terms of helping that individual develop and progress. With subsequent gaps in active management, learning and development, it’s not surprising that people are dissatisfied with their jobs and looking for new opportunities elsewhere.”

Dominique Jones, Chief People Officer at Halogen Software, said: “These figures demonstrate a clear need for employers to shift their approach to performance management — to make it an on-going part of the rhythm of work — not a separate, once-a year-burden. Regular one-on-one conversations between line managers and employees can help improve employee engagement and satisfaction when used to identify new opportunities for employees to develop, ensure clarity on goals and expectations, and to provide employees coaching and feedback related to performance outcomes. HR plays a critical role here in supporting line managers, guiding them and providing them with the right tools to enable them to listen, measure and act on employee needs.”

Further highlights of the survey include:

  • More employees are satisfied (41%) than dissatisfied
  • (36%) with their current level of pay
  • Almost a third of employees (31%) say they come home from work exhausted either often (24%) or always (7%)
  • Employee knowledge of organisational core purpose is very high (+70), but the number of employees that are highly motivated by their organisation’s core purpose is much lower (+28)
  • Employees are most likely to say that work makes them feel ‘cheerful’ (24%), most or all of the time as opposed to any other feeling. This is followed jointly by ‘optimistic’ and ‘stressed’, with 18% respectively saying work makes them feel this way most or all of the time
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27Apr
The biggest barrier to getting a pay rise? The fear of rejection
Business

Illustration depicting a sign with a pay rise concept.

 

The fear of rejection is the greatest barrier to UK employees asking for pay rises, according to a study by recruitment agency Randstad. Over a third (35.1%) cite fear of being turned down as the main reason for not asking for a salary boost, closely followed by their bosses’ reactions (34%) as well as the prospect of having to explain why they deserve it (29%).

If you don’t ask you don’t get, yet the fear of being turned down (35%) is the biggest barrier to asking for a pay rise,
72% of UK employees have not asked for an increase in the past three years
Other major concerns include the boss’s reaction (34%) and the prospect of having to justify yourself (29%)
Londoners know their worth: over a third (34%) of employees have asked for a pay rise in the past three years compared to 20% of East Anglians
Brits in North East England most forthright in asking for a pay rise in the UK with the highest proportion (12%) requesting an annual increase

The figures go some way to explaining why a staggering 72% of UK employees have not asked for an increase in the past three years and why only around a third (34%) would consider asking their current boss for a pay increase. Almost half of respondents (45%) are ‘very’ or ‘quite’ concerned that asking for a rise would jeopardise their current role.

Londoners are the most buoyant about their prospects for a salary rise with more than a third (34%) having asked for an increase over the past three years. But levels of confidence dwindle outside the capital. Least likely to ask for rises are East Anglians – 80.2% haven’t asked for a single increase in the past three years, followed by East Midlanders (80%) and employees in the North West (78%).

The most forthright about asking for pay increases are Brits in the North East of England where 12% have asked at least three times in the past three years, followed by Yorkshire & Humber (11.1%) and London (11%).

Men are more than twice as likely as women to have sought a pay increase (11.2% vs 5%), while more than seven in 10 (72%) women would never consider asking for a rise compared to just 57.8% of men. Fear of rejection (44%) was the main reason for women not wishing to take the plunge while, for men, the primary barrier was their managers’ reactions (26%).

Youngsters between 18-24 are the most eager to seek higher compensation – 14% have asked for at least three pay rises in the past three years – but this age group is also the most prone to doubt their abilities in front of their boss (48%), in comparison to the relatively stoic 55+ bracket (19%).

Mark Bull, UK CEO of global recruitment consultancy Randstad, comments: “Despite signs pointing to a shortage of professional skills in certain sectors, UK employees still aren’t taking advantage of the increasingly open employment market. With nearly three quarters not pushing for more money, and with explanations ranging from fear of rejection to jeopardising their current roles, questions should be raised about whether UK employers are creating the right working environment for their employees to stay and seek progression.”

Top three tips for securing pay rise:

Timing is everything. Get an idea as to when the budgets are agreed for the next calendar year. Most companies already have a clear policy on when pay rises can be agreed and will rarely flex the policy mid-term so be ready to acknowledge to your boss that your request is atypical if asking outside of the usual pay review cycle.
Do your research to get a solid understanding of the industry standards and general expectations for your role. If you feel undervalued, it’s worth looking at comparable positions in your sector to back up your claim. Building a well-researched case is vital to appearing professional and convincing your manager you’re worth the boost.
Draw on examples to illustrate where you’ve gone above and beyond your job description. Build your case for why you deserve a bigger pay packet and be prepared to back that up with hard facts – from sales figures to revenue you’ve helped secure.

 

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11Apr
Number of part-time male workers set to increase by 20%
Business

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Over the same period, the projected growth in part-time female workers is 7%

The number of part-time male workers is set to increase by 20% by 2024, according to research from the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES).

The report found that this growth is particularly marked for men in professional or management roles, where an increase of 25% is projected, signalling a significant change in the working patterns of men in highly paid, highly skilled positions.

Over the same period the projected growth in part-time female workers is 7%, and a 7% rise is also predicted for the number of women working full time.

Overall, the number of jobs in the UK is projected to rise by about 1.8 million between 2014 and 2024 – an average growth of about 0.5% per year. Private services are forecast to be the main engine of employment growth, contributing more than 90% of the net additional jobs during this timescale.

Lesley Giles, deputy director at UKCES, said that while part-time work is most common in low-paid professions and is largely dominated by women this report shows signs of that trend changing.

“The increase in men working flexible hours has been catalysed by the right to shared parental leave,” she said. “Coupled with other changes, like the growth in jobs in sectors traditionally dominated by women, this could represent a real change in the way people work and the way we understand gender roles in the labour market.”

Simon Allport, North West senior partner at EY, who himself works flexibly, said that it is not hard to understand the reasons behind this trend. “Quite simply, flexible working is a source of competitive advantage to employers,” he said. “It helps companies to attract and retain talented individuals.

“I took the decision to work flexibly in 2013 to spend more time with my family. The firm’s leadership, colleagues and clients have been hugely supportive and it’s brought a number of benefits for the business.

“We need to recognise that the world of work is changing and that a mature, modern workforce is flexible,” he added.

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21Mar
Jobs galore in London’s Square Mile … but not if you’re under 24
Business

Problems ahead as City fails to provide work opportunities for the capital’s young people

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London’s economy may be famously buoyant, but the Square Mile that has fuelled its prosperity is signally failing to create jobs for the capital’s young people.

A report to be published this week warns of problems ahead if the City does not act soon to help create opportunities for London’s young unemployed.

The study, from the City of London Corporation, the municipal governing body, states that nearly one in five young Londoners is now unemployed. Even though the capital generates almost a quarter of the UK’s wealth, it has England’s third highest rate of unemployment among 16- to 24-year-olds.

The findings echo those in a report in December, published by the New Policy Institute, which revealed that unemployment in London is two-and-a-half times higher for 16- to 24-year-olds than for those aged 25-64.

The corporation’s report is expected to claim that a continued failure to harness the economic dynamism of the capital and create jobs will lead to further exclusion and disadvantage among the young.

Backed by senior figures from City businesses, voluntary groups and local authorities, the report will challenge businesses across the capital to do more to prevent young people “falling through the net”, and will claim that they face a growing skills gap in the years ahead unless the “disconnect” between their needs and the training given to the young jobless is bridged.

The lord mayor of London, Jeffrey Mountevans, has recently called for businesses to provide more mentoring, work-experience schemes and apprenticeships. But the report will make clear that there are significant barriers facing unemployed young people hoping to get on to such schemes.

Figures provided by the Sutton Trust show that it costs £926 a month for someone to undertake an unpaid internship – putting the positions out of reach of many families.

A spokesman for the corporation said: “We have a responsibility to create a more fair, inclusive and sustainable society. We also want businesses where responsibility is central to all their decisions, all their activities and all their workers at all levels.”

The City’s leading financial firms are regularly attacked for paying their executives massive bonuses while failing to invest in junior staff. Earlier this year Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn accused City bankers of treating ordinary workers like a “cash cow”.

Clare McNeil, associate director of work, families and security at the Institute for Public Policy Research, said 18% of young Londoners were unable to find work, compared with a national average of 15%, in part because London has a more competitive jobs market.

But she also said the capital was lagging when it came to providing workplace schemes. “In terms of apprenticeships, the capital performs quite poorly,” McNeil said. “There is a lower participation in apprenticeships by employers than elsewhere in the UK. And while nearly half of internships are based in London, research points to the fact that it does tend to be those who are better connected who get them.”

A failure to find jobs for the younger generation will store up a host of socioeconomic problems, she suggested. “The longer it takes you to get a foothold in the labour market, the more of an impact it has on your future earnings,” McNeil said.

“People in their 20s and 30s are not able to catch up with older generations in terms of their earnings potential, so there’s an economic impact. But there’s a wider social impact, too. Younger people will become more disengaged, and that has all sorts of societal implications. Many people have made the link between the London riots and high levels of youth unemployment.”

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03Mar
Brits see flexibility as a top priority in the workplace
Business

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Brits more likely to take a job that offers flexible working, according to latest research.

UK businesses that don’t offer flexible working will struggle to attract and retain top talent, according new research from UC EXPO, part of Europe’s number one IT enterprise event series.

The research, conducted amongst 1000 UK office workers, found that job roles offering flexible working are more likely to attract a better candidate, with 82% of workers saying they would be more likely to take a job that offered flexible working benefits. An additional 71% said that the offer of flexible working would help businesses to attract a greater international talent pool.

Flexible working more important than a free breakfast

The research finds that the benefits of flexible working are more widely recognised than a year ago, with a fifth (22%) of those surveyed having worked at home or remotely more throughout 2015 than in 2014. With over a quarter (27%) of UK workers now regularly working outside the office, the majority cite happiness as the biggest benefits. Nine in 10 (90%) feel that it is essential in maintaining a better work/life balance and 88% believe staff would be happier overall. In fact, two-thirds (67%) said they’d prefer the ability to work remotely over free breakfast every day!

Productivity concerns around employees working from home is decreasing, with over two-thirds (67%) believing that productivity levels either increase or stay the same when they work remotely.

UK workers see remote and flexible working as a right

Despite the general consensus that flexible working tools and technologies are vital in ensuring employee happiness and job satisfaction, an alarming two-fifths (39%) of workers aren’t aware of their right to request flexible working from their employer, despite fact that there is a law in place. Whilst this has decreased from 50% who said they were not aware of the right last year, many companies, and employees, still aren’t reaping the benefits of flexible working.

But workers are in full agreement that they should have the right to request flexible working, with three-quarters (74%) saying they also want to be given the right to request remote working too.

The workplace of the future – goodbye, 9-5

Over two-thirds (68%) of office workers believe that new collaboration and remote working technologies will eventually substitute office working. With 29% of Brits now working flexible hours, the traditional 9-5 is declining rapidly.

Bradley Maule-ffinch, Director of Strategy for UC EXPO, says: “With a growing workforce of digital natives – not to mention multiple obstacles such as travel strikes in cities such as London – it’s not surprising that people favour a flexible approach to their work. Employers need to keep up with their staff’s technology and working preferences in order to retain them. At this year’s UC EXPO, we’ll be hosting panels, discussions and keynotes on how businesses can use unified communications & collaboration technologies to connect staff globally better than ever before and reap huge business benefits.”

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